European University Institute Library

Colonialism, Independence, and the Construction of Nation-States, by Forrest D. Colburn

Label
Colonialism, Independence, and the Construction of Nation-States, by Forrest D. Colburn
Language
eng
resource.imageBitDepth
0
Literary Form
non fiction
Main title
Colonialism, Independence, and the Construction of Nation-States
Medium
electronic resource
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Oclc number
1202477005
Responsibility statement
by Forrest D. Colburn
Series statement
Springer eBooks.
Summary
‘Why have some poor countries remained “underdeveloped,” or even “failed,” while others have become richer and stronger? In the successful group, have a few—notably China—enhanced methods long used by European imperialists to extract national resources from weaker countries? Has solidarity among poor countries ended? What does the future hold for poor countries? For compelling answers to these questions, read Colburn’s Colonialism, Independence, and the Construction of Nation-States.’ – Lynn T. White III, Professor, Princeton University, New Jersey, USA ‘Colburn’s Colonialism, Independence, and the Construction of Nation-States is both an enlightening and enjoyable read. It is wide-ranging yet enlivened by telling examples.’ – Michael Doyle, Professor, Columbia University, New York, USA ‘Forrest Colburn’s Colonialism, Independence, and the Construction of Nation-States is in part, and most significantly, a welcome attempt to revisit the history of basic ideas from the past, that should not have been shelved. Development, Third World, colonialism, North-South, are notions that surfaced in the sixties and seventies, and faded under the influence of excessive enthusiasm for “emerging markets” in the new century. Colburn explains splendidly why the history of these notions, and their content, is more relevant than ever.’ – Jorge Castañeda, Former Foreign Minister of Mexico, and Professor, New York University, New York, USA This book analyzes how the poorer countries of the world have a shared history: these many countries were assaulted, overrun, and sometimes even formed by European colonialism. The wave of accessions to legal independence in the aftermath of World War II was of extraordinary importance. There was an intoxicating confidence and determination, a sense that everything was possible. A half-century later, the world looks different. The author adroitly delineates the uneven performance of newly-constructed or reimagined nation-states, and the shifting perceptions of the poorer countries in the world. Forrest D. Colburn is a Professor at the City University of New York, New York, USA.--, Provided by publisher
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