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The Resource Who lives, who dies, who decides? : abortion, neonatal care, assisted dying, and capital punishment, Sheldon Ekland-Olson

Who lives, who dies, who decides? : abortion, neonatal care, assisted dying, and capital punishment, Sheldon Ekland-Olson

Label
Who lives, who dies, who decides? : abortion, neonatal care, assisted dying, and capital punishment
Title
Who lives, who dies, who decides?
Title remainder
abortion, neonatal care, assisted dying, and capital punishment
Statement of responsibility
Sheldon Ekland-Olson
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"This second edition of Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Decides? has been updated to consider the rising stakes for issues of life and death. Abortion, assisted dying, and capital punishment are among the most contentious issues in many societies and demand debate. Whose rights are protected? How do these rights and protections change over time and who makes those decisions? Based on the author's award-winning and hugely popular undergraduate course at the University of Texas and highly recommended by Choice Magazine, this book explores the fundamentally sociological processes which underlie the quest for morality and justice in human societies. The Author's goal is not to advocate any particular moral "high ground" but to shed light on the social movements and social processes which are at the root of these seemingly personal moral questions and to develop readers to develop their own opinions"--
Member of
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1944-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Ekland-Olson, Sheldon
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Contemporary sociological perspectives
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Life
  • Death
  • Suffering
Label
Who lives, who dies, who decides? : abortion, neonatal care, assisted dying, and capital punishment, Sheldon Ekland-Olson
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
  • The material covered travels over a varied landscape-eugenics, abortion, neonatal care, assisted suicide, lynching, and capital punishment.
  • The Summer of Mercy
  • Taking Lives to Save Lives
  • The Army of God
  • Following Roe v. Wade, other cases addressed additional issues in seemingly contradictory decisions.
  • Together, they infused a heated political debate that would last decades and reshape the political landscape.
  • Basic questions regarding the legal and moral legitimacy of governmental actions were raised.
  • Protests intensified.
  • They eventually included clinic bombings and the murder of abortion providers.
  • 8.
  • Inches From Life
  • The single common theme is assessed social worth.
  • Words and Images
  • Protecting Health as Well as Life
  • The Political Landscape
  • A Strange and Strained Argument
  • The Political Landscape Shifts
  • Legal Details
  • Adapting to a Strange and Strained Decision
  • Of particular concern were abortions performed late in pregnancy.
  • Partial-birth abortions became a phrase of political art.
  • Statutes were crafted.
  • In each case, the focus is upon two deeply important moral imperatives: life is sacred and should be protected.
  • Early attempts foundered for failing to consider the health of the mother.
  • After several failed attempts, a strange and strained federal statute was adopted, protecting life during the latter stages of pregnancy, not in principle but by anatomical markers as the infant emerged from the birth canal.
  • Medical practices took account of, and adjusted to, these markers as late-term abortions continued.
  • 9.
  • Should The Baby Live?
  • Lives Worth Living, Protecting, and Supporting
  • Regulations Emerge
  • Nagging Uncertainties-Who Should Decide?
  • When Doctors Say No
  • Dealing With Futility
  • Suffering, once detected, should be alleviated.
  • Dealing With Uncertainty
  • The issues did not go away with birth.
  • Medical advances made it possible to prolong the lives of young infants in ways previously not possible.
  • Questions were raised about the wisdom of prolonging young lives in the face of birth defects and painful, debilitating conditions.
  • New regulations were proposed and eventually refined.
  • Questions remained.
  • What were the boundaries of privacy for parental choice, and what were the boundaries of a life worth living?
  • Who should decide?
  • What should we do when parents wanted medical care continued, but physicians saw further treatment as futile?
  • Given the uncertainty of prognoses, decisions are most frequently made in a sea of ambiguity.
  • Comparing these otherwise distinct topics, we ask a single question: How do we go about justifying the violation of these deeply important, perhaps universal, moral imperatives, while holding tightly to their importance?
  • 10.
  • Limits To Tolerable Suffering
  • The Boundaries of Tolerable Suffering
  • Troubling Cases in Troubled Times
  • The Stages of Suffering
  • Please Let Me Die
  • When Life Becomes Vegetative
  • Like the boundaries of life worth protecting, the boundaries of tolerable suffering are hazy.
  • To make matters more uncertain, tolerance for suffering appears to shift over time.
  • We adjust, even to life's most difficult moments.
  • The short answer is this: with empathy and logic, we draw boundaries and we resolve dilemmas.
  • Advances in life-prolonging medical technologies in the mid twentieth century accentuated these long-standing issues as never before.
  • Life could be prolonged, even when life had lost all meaning and when suffering was the result.
  • 11.
  • Alleviating Suffering And Protecting Life
  • Prolonged Death and the Public Good
  • The Right-to-Die Movement Gains Momentum
  • Public Opinion and Legislative Action
  • California Takes the Lead
  • Alleviating Suffering and Protecting Life: Who Decides?
  • The Supreme Court Weighs In
  • From time to time, science, technology, and crystallizing events disturb, clarify, and inform existing understandings of the implied sense of social worth.
  • The Gift of Death
  • As life-prolonging technologies were perfected, life could be maintained even in the face of severe suffering and even when life approximated that of a vegetable.
  • The protection of life and the alleviation of suffering were seen as frequently competitive.
  • How was the resulting dilemma resolved?
  • Patient autonomy had been affirmed many times over many years.
  • Still, if a patient chose to end their life, no longer seen as worth living, there were competing, collective interests to prevent them.
  • 12.
  • God, Duty, And Life Worth Living
  • Belief in an Efficacious, Caring God
  • Uncertainty, a Duty to Die, and Rationed Health Care
  • New resolutions of dilemmas and definitions of life's protective boundaries are called for.
  • Lives Less Worthy of Living?
  • Death With Dignity
  • Religious beliefs are central to how one approaches the end of life.
  • Belief in an efficacious, caring god, a god who can be reached through prayer, is particularly important.
  • For those who pray often, god should be trusted
  • In this manner, moral systems evolve.
  • They do so along a jagged and often contentious path.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • 2.
  • An Exclusionary Movement Is Born
  • Some Lives Are More Worthy Than Others
  • Eugenics Becomes a Duty
  • A Base of Operation
  • Framing the Agenda
  • Branching Out
  • The Criteria for Exclusion
  • The foundation of the Eugenics Movement in the United States is reviewed.
  • This movement was grounded in the work of Charles Darwin.
  • 1.
  • It was shaped and advanced by a small, interconnected network of well-regarded intellectuals, philanthropists, and political leaders.
  • It soon reached coast to coast and took on national implications.
  • 3.
  • Legal Reform To Eliminate Defectives
  • How to Limit Defectives
  • A Moral Entrepreneur Reviews the Landscape
  • Framing a Legitimized Logic of Exclusion
  • A Receptive Exclusionary Climate
  • Mobilizing Resources and Networks of Support
  • The Legal Framework Clarifies
  • A Single Question
  • A Landmark Case is Contrived
  • The Floodgates Open
  • Public-Health Measures Go Terribly Wrong
  • A major objective of the Eugenics Movement was to develop a model law that would be adopted nationwide.
  • After several attempts, a basic template was agreed upon in the early 1920s.
  • The State of Virginia was a leader.
  • In 1927, the Supreme Court, in Buck v. Bell, legitimized Virginia's statute following a contrived trial and appeal.
  • Numerous states soon adopted similar statutes.
  • In 1933, the newly formed government of Adolf Hitler took note and adopted a close approximation of the laws passed in the United States.
  • Some three years later, the model law's author, Harry Laughlin, was given an honorary degree from Heidelberg University in recognition of his work on racial cleansing.
  • A Moral System Evolves
  • 4.
  • Redrawing The Boundaries Of Protected Life
  • An Awakening
  • Science, Technology, and Cultural Lag
  • A Crystallizing Event and Rationing Health Care
  • Social Worth and Rationed Health Care
  • Stories Are Told, Doctrines Explored
  • The Decade of Conferences
  • Flawed Judgment and Sloppy Science
  • Harvesting for Lip
  • The Early Moments and Months of Life
  • Deference to Doctors
  • A Harvard Committee Redefines Death
  • A Paradigm for Protected Life.
  • Following World War II, the soul-searing consequences of policies defining some lives as less worthy of protection and support than others became glaringly evident.
  • At the same time, revolutionary advances were being made in the biological sciences.
  • Together, these scientific, technological, and cultural developments set the stage for a reconsideration of human and civil rights and the protective boundaries life.
  • 5.
  • Crystallizing Events And Ethical Principles
  • A Term is Coined
  • Two Centers Frame the Debate
  • The Boundaries of Tolerable Suffering
  • Four Crystallizing Events
  • The Search for Common Principles
  • The Belmont Report and the Georgetown Principles
  • Bioethics in Action
  • As the rethinking of the boundaries of protected life progressed, legislation was proposed to formalize broad ethical principles and strengthen regulations of the medical profession.
  • Early attempts failed.
  • Four crystallizing events, involving medical experiments that reminded many of practices in Nazi Germany, precipitated legislative action and the launching of what came to be known as the bioethics movement.
  • 6.
  • A Bolt From The Blue: Abortion Is Legalized
  • From Comstockery to the Right to Privacy
  • Taking Life and Inflicting Suffering
  • Potential for Life, Potential for Suffering
  • A Social Movement Splinters
  • A Bolt from the Blue
  • An early focus of the bioethics movement was abortion.
  • A rubella pandemic and the widely publicized story of a mother who had taken Thalidomide early in her pregnancy captured the nation's attention.
  • Existing restrictive abortion laws came under increased criticism.
  • Two Supreme Court cases involving the use of contraception set the stage for Roe v. Wade and a companion case, Doe v. Bolton.
  • In Roe, the court confirmed what the contraception cases had established: there was a right to privacy.
  • The court also established that a fetus was not a fully protected person under the Constitution.
  • For many, this decision came like a "bolt from the blue."
  • The Single Question
  • 7.
  • Man's Law Or God's Will
  • Landmark Cases Take Shape
  • Legitimacy Questioned
  • A Clash of Absolutes?
  • The Power of Empathy
  • Protests and Rescue Missions
  • Violence Increases
  • Operation Rescue
  • Roe Reexamined
Control code
FIEb17663337
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
Second edition.
Extent
xxviii, 433 pages
Isbn
9781138808799
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)885983235
Label
Who lives, who dies, who decides? : abortion, neonatal care, assisted dying, and capital punishment, Sheldon Ekland-Olson
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
  • The material covered travels over a varied landscape-eugenics, abortion, neonatal care, assisted suicide, lynching, and capital punishment.
  • The Summer of Mercy
  • Taking Lives to Save Lives
  • The Army of God
  • Following Roe v. Wade, other cases addressed additional issues in seemingly contradictory decisions.
  • Together, they infused a heated political debate that would last decades and reshape the political landscape.
  • Basic questions regarding the legal and moral legitimacy of governmental actions were raised.
  • Protests intensified.
  • They eventually included clinic bombings and the murder of abortion providers.
  • 8.
  • Inches From Life
  • The single common theme is assessed social worth.
  • Words and Images
  • Protecting Health as Well as Life
  • The Political Landscape
  • A Strange and Strained Argument
  • The Political Landscape Shifts
  • Legal Details
  • Adapting to a Strange and Strained Decision
  • Of particular concern were abortions performed late in pregnancy.
  • Partial-birth abortions became a phrase of political art.
  • Statutes were crafted.
  • In each case, the focus is upon two deeply important moral imperatives: life is sacred and should be protected.
  • Early attempts foundered for failing to consider the health of the mother.
  • After several failed attempts, a strange and strained federal statute was adopted, protecting life during the latter stages of pregnancy, not in principle but by anatomical markers as the infant emerged from the birth canal.
  • Medical practices took account of, and adjusted to, these markers as late-term abortions continued.
  • 9.
  • Should The Baby Live?
  • Lives Worth Living, Protecting, and Supporting
  • Regulations Emerge
  • Nagging Uncertainties-Who Should Decide?
  • When Doctors Say No
  • Dealing With Futility
  • Suffering, once detected, should be alleviated.
  • Dealing With Uncertainty
  • The issues did not go away with birth.
  • Medical advances made it possible to prolong the lives of young infants in ways previously not possible.
  • Questions were raised about the wisdom of prolonging young lives in the face of birth defects and painful, debilitating conditions.
  • New regulations were proposed and eventually refined.
  • Questions remained.
  • What were the boundaries of privacy for parental choice, and what were the boundaries of a life worth living?
  • Who should decide?
  • What should we do when parents wanted medical care continued, but physicians saw further treatment as futile?
  • Given the uncertainty of prognoses, decisions are most frequently made in a sea of ambiguity.
  • Comparing these otherwise distinct topics, we ask a single question: How do we go about justifying the violation of these deeply important, perhaps universal, moral imperatives, while holding tightly to their importance?
  • 10.
  • Limits To Tolerable Suffering
  • The Boundaries of Tolerable Suffering
  • Troubling Cases in Troubled Times
  • The Stages of Suffering
  • Please Let Me Die
  • When Life Becomes Vegetative
  • Like the boundaries of life worth protecting, the boundaries of tolerable suffering are hazy.
  • To make matters more uncertain, tolerance for suffering appears to shift over time.
  • We adjust, even to life's most difficult moments.
  • The short answer is this: with empathy and logic, we draw boundaries and we resolve dilemmas.
  • Advances in life-prolonging medical technologies in the mid twentieth century accentuated these long-standing issues as never before.
  • Life could be prolonged, even when life had lost all meaning and when suffering was the result.
  • 11.
  • Alleviating Suffering And Protecting Life
  • Prolonged Death and the Public Good
  • The Right-to-Die Movement Gains Momentum
  • Public Opinion and Legislative Action
  • California Takes the Lead
  • Alleviating Suffering and Protecting Life: Who Decides?
  • The Supreme Court Weighs In
  • From time to time, science, technology, and crystallizing events disturb, clarify, and inform existing understandings of the implied sense of social worth.
  • The Gift of Death
  • As life-prolonging technologies were perfected, life could be maintained even in the face of severe suffering and even when life approximated that of a vegetable.
  • The protection of life and the alleviation of suffering were seen as frequently competitive.
  • How was the resulting dilemma resolved?
  • Patient autonomy had been affirmed many times over many years.
  • Still, if a patient chose to end their life, no longer seen as worth living, there were competing, collective interests to prevent them.
  • 12.
  • God, Duty, And Life Worth Living
  • Belief in an Efficacious, Caring God
  • Uncertainty, a Duty to Die, and Rationed Health Care
  • New resolutions of dilemmas and definitions of life's protective boundaries are called for.
  • Lives Less Worthy of Living?
  • Death With Dignity
  • Religious beliefs are central to how one approaches the end of life.
  • Belief in an efficacious, caring god, a god who can be reached through prayer, is particularly important.
  • For those who pray often, god should be trusted
  • In this manner, moral systems evolve.
  • They do so along a jagged and often contentious path.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • 2.
  • An Exclusionary Movement Is Born
  • Some Lives Are More Worthy Than Others
  • Eugenics Becomes a Duty
  • A Base of Operation
  • Framing the Agenda
  • Branching Out
  • The Criteria for Exclusion
  • The foundation of the Eugenics Movement in the United States is reviewed.
  • This movement was grounded in the work of Charles Darwin.
  • 1.
  • It was shaped and advanced by a small, interconnected network of well-regarded intellectuals, philanthropists, and political leaders.
  • It soon reached coast to coast and took on national implications.
  • 3.
  • Legal Reform To Eliminate Defectives
  • How to Limit Defectives
  • A Moral Entrepreneur Reviews the Landscape
  • Framing a Legitimized Logic of Exclusion
  • A Receptive Exclusionary Climate
  • Mobilizing Resources and Networks of Support
  • The Legal Framework Clarifies
  • A Single Question
  • A Landmark Case is Contrived
  • The Floodgates Open
  • Public-Health Measures Go Terribly Wrong
  • A major objective of the Eugenics Movement was to develop a model law that would be adopted nationwide.
  • After several attempts, a basic template was agreed upon in the early 1920s.
  • The State of Virginia was a leader.
  • In 1927, the Supreme Court, in Buck v. Bell, legitimized Virginia's statute following a contrived trial and appeal.
  • Numerous states soon adopted similar statutes.
  • In 1933, the newly formed government of Adolf Hitler took note and adopted a close approximation of the laws passed in the United States.
  • Some three years later, the model law's author, Harry Laughlin, was given an honorary degree from Heidelberg University in recognition of his work on racial cleansing.
  • A Moral System Evolves
  • 4.
  • Redrawing The Boundaries Of Protected Life
  • An Awakening
  • Science, Technology, and Cultural Lag
  • A Crystallizing Event and Rationing Health Care
  • Social Worth and Rationed Health Care
  • Stories Are Told, Doctrines Explored
  • The Decade of Conferences
  • Flawed Judgment and Sloppy Science
  • Harvesting for Lip
  • The Early Moments and Months of Life
  • Deference to Doctors
  • A Harvard Committee Redefines Death
  • A Paradigm for Protected Life.
  • Following World War II, the soul-searing consequences of policies defining some lives as less worthy of protection and support than others became glaringly evident.
  • At the same time, revolutionary advances were being made in the biological sciences.
  • Together, these scientific, technological, and cultural developments set the stage for a reconsideration of human and civil rights and the protective boundaries life.
  • 5.
  • Crystallizing Events And Ethical Principles
  • A Term is Coined
  • Two Centers Frame the Debate
  • The Boundaries of Tolerable Suffering
  • Four Crystallizing Events
  • The Search for Common Principles
  • The Belmont Report and the Georgetown Principles
  • Bioethics in Action
  • As the rethinking of the boundaries of protected life progressed, legislation was proposed to formalize broad ethical principles and strengthen regulations of the medical profession.
  • Early attempts failed.
  • Four crystallizing events, involving medical experiments that reminded many of practices in Nazi Germany, precipitated legislative action and the launching of what came to be known as the bioethics movement.
  • 6.
  • A Bolt From The Blue: Abortion Is Legalized
  • From Comstockery to the Right to Privacy
  • Taking Life and Inflicting Suffering
  • Potential for Life, Potential for Suffering
  • A Social Movement Splinters
  • A Bolt from the Blue
  • An early focus of the bioethics movement was abortion.
  • A rubella pandemic and the widely publicized story of a mother who had taken Thalidomide early in her pregnancy captured the nation's attention.
  • Existing restrictive abortion laws came under increased criticism.
  • Two Supreme Court cases involving the use of contraception set the stage for Roe v. Wade and a companion case, Doe v. Bolton.
  • In Roe, the court confirmed what the contraception cases had established: there was a right to privacy.
  • The court also established that a fetus was not a fully protected person under the Constitution.
  • For many, this decision came like a "bolt from the blue."
  • The Single Question
  • 7.
  • Man's Law Or God's Will
  • Landmark Cases Take Shape
  • Legitimacy Questioned
  • A Clash of Absolutes?
  • The Power of Empathy
  • Protests and Rescue Missions
  • Violence Increases
  • Operation Rescue
  • Roe Reexamined
Control code
FIEb17663337
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
Second edition.
Extent
xxviii, 433 pages
Isbn
9781138808799
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)885983235

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