The Resource Who is a "Ukrainian" child? : UNRRA/IRO welfare workers and the politics of unaccompanied children of presumed Ukrainian origin in the aftermath of WWII (1945-1952), Olga Gnydiuk

Who is a "Ukrainian" child? : UNRRA/IRO welfare workers and the politics of unaccompanied children of presumed Ukrainian origin in the aftermath of WWII (1945-1952), Olga Gnydiuk

Label
Who is a "Ukrainian" child? : UNRRA/IRO welfare workers and the politics of unaccompanied children of presumed Ukrainian origin in the aftermath of WWII (1945-1952)
Title
Who is a "Ukrainian" child?
Title remainder
UNRRA/IRO welfare workers and the politics of unaccompanied children of presumed Ukrainian origin in the aftermath of WWII (1945-1952)
Statement of responsibility
Olga Gnydiuk
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The care and rehabilitation of displaced, orphaned or lost children after World War II became a significant challenge for the international humanitarian organizations, as well as for the military governments in the occupied territories. This dissertation explores the policies and practices that the welfare authorities and officers of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) and International Refugee Organization, as well as American military officers in the US zone of Germany, formulated regarding the relief and resettlement of unaccompanied displaced children of Ukrainian origin between 1945 and 1952. From the autumn of 1945 onwards, the humanitarian officers with the approval of American officials in the US zone of Germany started to withhold Ukrainian children who originally came from the eastern Polish territories that were annexed by the Soviet Union from repatriation. The US military authorities declared that they did not recognize these children as Soviet citizens and instructed the welfare officers to consider them as nationals without governmental representation. As a result, the conflict over these children with the Soviet authorities, who were eager to repatriate them was inevitable. This dissertation explores how this geopolitical dispute shaped the policies of resettlement, care and welfare provision related to displaced children. By analyzing how the welfare officers and US military officials debated the national belonging and future destiny of these children, this study demonstrates how their decisions and activities in relation to Ukrainian children were founded on a humanitarian and political setting, which was formed by a pre-Cold War discourse. The examination of the IRO welfare officers' work with these children on the ground showed that repatriation to the Soviet Union was no longer considered to be in the best interests of Polish-Ukrainian children, while emigration and settlement in Germany was. This led the study to make a striking observation on how the IRO's welfare workers began to reconsider the future plans for the unaccompanied children who were living in German foster families. Namely, that from 1948, not long after the war had ended, welfare officers began to consider that allowing children to be adopted into German families would be in their best interests. Such opinions were voiced in spite of the Nazi’s Germanization program still being fresh in peoples’ memories, as well as more general fears that German society would hold a negative attitude towards foreign children. Finally, this case study provides a closer look at the complex relationships between the military and welfare authorities and officers that ranged from the disagreements about approaches to a child's resettlement to their joint work in the issues related to Ukrainian children
Cataloging source
FIE
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Gnydiuk, Olga
Date time place
Defence date: 22 June 2018
Dissertation note
Thesis (Ph. D.)--European University Institute (HEC), 2018
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
theses
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
European University Institute
Series statement
  • EUI PhD theses.
  • EUI theses
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • International Refugee Organization
  • United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Abandoned children
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Adoption
Label
Who is a "Ukrainian" child? : UNRRA/IRO welfare workers and the politics of unaccompanied children of presumed Ukrainian origin in the aftermath of WWII (1945-1952), Olga Gnydiuk
Link
http://hdl.handle.net/1814/57924
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Examining Board: Professor Laura Lee Downs, European University Institute (EUI Supervisor); Professor
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 237 - 252)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
FIE
Dimensions
30 cm.
Extent
252 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Label
Who is a "Ukrainian" child? : UNRRA/IRO welfare workers and the politics of unaccompanied children of presumed Ukrainian origin in the aftermath of WWII (1945-1952), Olga Gnydiuk
Link
http://hdl.handle.net/1814/57924
Publication
Note
Examining Board: Professor Laura Lee Downs, European University Institute (EUI Supervisor); Professor
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 237 - 252)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
FIE
Dimensions
30 cm.
Extent
252 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n

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