The Resource Unity or fracture? : explaining political preference formation among large American, British, and German firms, Niels Selling

Unity or fracture? : explaining political preference formation among large American, British, and German firms, Niels Selling

Label
Unity or fracture? : explaining political preference formation among large American, British, and German firms
Title
Unity or fracture?
Title remainder
explaining political preference formation among large American, British, and German firms
Statement of responsibility
Niels Selling
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This is a thesis on political preference formation, which refers to the ways in which actors learn to prefer one political option over another. In political science, these actors are usually private citizens, in their role as voters, and it is easy to see that voting behavior will continue to dominate the research on political preferences. After the referendum that saw a majority of Britons in favor of leaving the EU and the American election of 2016, which brought Donald J. Trump to the White House, people now call for political scientists to spend the next few years trying to figure out how this could have possibly happened.1 It is a safe bet that political science journals will be filled to the brim with articles on the topic and that many, many hours in university classrooms will be devoted to discussions of Trumpism, authoritarianism, anti-immigrant sentiments, white backlash, et cetera. As important as this is, the road that this study travels takes a different turn. It heads away from elections and referendums - "electoral spectacles", as Hacker and Pierson (2011, p. 86) call them - and instead takes aim at preference formation among large firms, the type of actor that, according to the same authors, truly shapes politics in the long run. Brexit and Trump’s triumph are described as big defeats for big business. During the campaigns, the American business community was depicted as overwhelmingly anti-Trump, the British as a staunch “Remainiac”. Although these sentiments undoubtedly percolated through vast swaths, the story is more multifaceted. While it is true that, for example, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos proposed that Donald Trump should be sent to space and Elon Musk said that Trump "is probably not the right guy" for president, other corporate leaders seemingly warmed to Trump, such as Bruce Van Saun, CEO of Citizens Financial Group, and Andrew N. Liveris, CEO of Dow Chemical, to mention but two.2 In the United Kingdom, three hundred business leaders signed an open letter urging Britain to leave the EU3 and in a poll, only 43 percent of FTSE 350 firms viewed Brexit as "potentially damaging."4 This is not to say that American and British firms were perfectly divided on these issues, only that it is difficult to find examples of business consensus, even in the instances when we are most likely to do so
Cataloging source
FIE
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Selling, Niels
Date time place
Defence date: 28 May 2018
Dissertation note
Thesis (Ph. D.)--European University Institute (SPS), 2018
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
theses
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
European University Institute
Series statement
  • EUI PhD theses.
  • EUI theses
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Business and politics
  • Business enterprises
  • International business enterprises
  • Corporate power
Label
Unity or fracture? : explaining political preference formation among large American, British, and German firms, Niels Selling
Link
http://hdl.handle.net/1814/55584
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Examining Board: Professor Pepper Culpepper, formerly EUI / University of Oxford (Supervisor); Professor Philipp Genschel, European University Institute; Professor Mark Mizruchi, University of Michigan; Dr. Stefano Pagliari, City University of London
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 165-185)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
30 cm.
Extent
vii, 215 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1044719099
Label
Unity or fracture? : explaining political preference formation among large American, British, and German firms, Niels Selling
Link
http://hdl.handle.net/1814/55584
Publication
Note
Examining Board: Professor Pepper Culpepper, formerly EUI / University of Oxford (Supervisor); Professor Philipp Genschel, European University Institute; Professor Mark Mizruchi, University of Michigan; Dr. Stefano Pagliari, City University of London
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 165-185)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
30 cm.
Extent
vii, 215 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1044719099

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