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The Resource Pluralism in international criminal law, edited by Elies van Sliedregt; Sergey Vasiliev

Pluralism in international criminal law, edited by Elies van Sliedregt; Sergey Vasiliev

Label
Pluralism in international criminal law
Title
Pluralism in international criminal law
Statement of responsibility
edited by Elies van Sliedregt; Sergey Vasiliev
Creator
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Despite the growth in international criminal courts and tribunals, the majority of cases concerning international criminal law are prosecuted at the domestic level. This means that both international and domestic courts have to contend with a plethora of relevant, but often contradictory, judgments by international institutions and by other domestic courts. This book provides a detailed investigation into the impact this pluralism has had on international criminal law and procedure, and examines the key problems which arise from it. The work identifies the various interpretations of the concept of pluralism and discusses how it manifests in a broad range of aspects of international criminal law and practice. These include substantive jurisdiction, the definition of crimes, modes of individual criminal responsibility for international crimes, sentencing, fair trial rights, law of evidence, truth-finding, and challenges faced by both international and domestic courts in gathering, testing and evaluating evidence. Authored by leading practitioners and academics in the field, the book employs pluralism as a methodological tool to advance the debate beyond the classic view of 'legal pluralism' leading to a problematic fragmentation of the international legal order. It argues instead that pluralism is a fundamental and indispensable feature of international criminal law which permeates it on several levels: through multiple legal regimes and enforcement fora, diversified sources and interpretations of concepts, and numerous identities underpinning the law and practice. The book addresses the virtues and dangers of pluralism, reflecting on the need for, and prospects of, harmonization of international criminal law around a common grammar. It ultimately brings together the theories of legal pluralism, the comparative law discourse on legal transplants, harmonization, and convergence, and the international legal debate on fragmentation to show where pluralism and divergence will need to be accepted as regular, and even beneficial, features of international criminal justice.--
Assigning source
Provided by Publisher
Cataloging source
DEBSZ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Sliedregt, E. van
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Vasiliev, Sergey
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • International criminal law
  • Criminal procedure (International law)
  • Criminal jurisdiction
  • Legal polycentricity
Label
Pluralism in international criminal law, edited by Elies van Sliedregt; Sergey Vasiliev
Link
https://opac.eui.eu/client/en_GB/default/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fSD_ILS$002f0$002fSD_ILS:390320/one
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
PART I. PLURALISM: CONCEPTUAL PERSPECTIVES 1: Elies Van Sliedregt and Sergey Vasiliew: Pluralism: A New Framework for International Criminal Justice 2: Cassandra Steer: Legal Transplants or Legal Patchworking? The Creation of International Criminal Law as a Pluralistic Body of Law 3: Mark A. Drumbl: The Curious Criminality of Mass Atrocity: Diverse Actors, Multiple Truths, and Plural Responses PART II: HORIZONTAL PLURALISM 4: Jens David Ohlin: Organizational Criminality 5: Marjolein Cupido: Pluralism in Theories of Liability: Joint Criminal Enterprise versus Joint Perception 6: John D. Jackson and Yassin Brunger: Fragmentation and Harmonization in the Development of Evidentiary Practices in International Criminal Tribunals 7: Barbora Holá: Consistency and Pluralism of International Sentencing: An Empirical Assessment of the ICTY and ICTR Practice PART III: VERTICAL PLURALISM 8: Ruth A. Kok: National Adjudication of International Crimes: A Dutch Approach 9: Alexander Zahar: Pluralism and the Rights of the Accused in International Criminal Proceedings 10: Elinor Fry: The Nature of International Crimes and Evidentiary Challenges: Preserving Quality While Managing Quantity 11: Wayne Jordash QC and Matthew R. Crowe: Evidentiary Challenges for the Defence: Domestic and International Prosecutions of International Crimes PART IV: HARMONIZATION, UNIFORMITY, OR HEGEMONY? 12: Gerhard Werle and Boris Burghardt: Establishing Degrees of Responsibility: Modes of Participation in Article 25 of the ICC Statute 13: James G. Stewart: Ten Reasons for Adopting a Universal Concept of Participation in Atrocity 14: Javid Gadirov: Collective Intentions and Individual Criminal Responsibility in International Criminal Law 15: H.H. Judge Peter Murphy and Lina Baddour: Evidence and Selection of Judges in International Criminal Tribunals: The Need for a Harmonized Approach
Control code
FIEb17591168
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xxxix, 435 pages
Isbn
9780198703198
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
System control number
(OCoLC)879591762
Label
Pluralism in international criminal law, edited by Elies van Sliedregt; Sergey Vasiliev
Link
https://opac.eui.eu/client/en_GB/default/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fSD_ILS$002f0$002fSD_ILS:390320/one
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
PART I. PLURALISM: CONCEPTUAL PERSPECTIVES 1: Elies Van Sliedregt and Sergey Vasiliew: Pluralism: A New Framework for International Criminal Justice 2: Cassandra Steer: Legal Transplants or Legal Patchworking? The Creation of International Criminal Law as a Pluralistic Body of Law 3: Mark A. Drumbl: The Curious Criminality of Mass Atrocity: Diverse Actors, Multiple Truths, and Plural Responses PART II: HORIZONTAL PLURALISM 4: Jens David Ohlin: Organizational Criminality 5: Marjolein Cupido: Pluralism in Theories of Liability: Joint Criminal Enterprise versus Joint Perception 6: John D. Jackson and Yassin Brunger: Fragmentation and Harmonization in the Development of Evidentiary Practices in International Criminal Tribunals 7: Barbora Holá: Consistency and Pluralism of International Sentencing: An Empirical Assessment of the ICTY and ICTR Practice PART III: VERTICAL PLURALISM 8: Ruth A. Kok: National Adjudication of International Crimes: A Dutch Approach 9: Alexander Zahar: Pluralism and the Rights of the Accused in International Criminal Proceedings 10: Elinor Fry: The Nature of International Crimes and Evidentiary Challenges: Preserving Quality While Managing Quantity 11: Wayne Jordash QC and Matthew R. Crowe: Evidentiary Challenges for the Defence: Domestic and International Prosecutions of International Crimes PART IV: HARMONIZATION, UNIFORMITY, OR HEGEMONY? 12: Gerhard Werle and Boris Burghardt: Establishing Degrees of Responsibility: Modes of Participation in Article 25 of the ICC Statute 13: James G. Stewart: Ten Reasons for Adopting a Universal Concept of Participation in Atrocity 14: Javid Gadirov: Collective Intentions and Individual Criminal Responsibility in International Criminal Law 15: H.H. Judge Peter Murphy and Lina Baddour: Evidence and Selection of Judges in International Criminal Tribunals: The Need for a Harmonized Approach
Control code
FIEb17591168
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xxxix, 435 pages
Isbn
9780198703198
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
System control number
(OCoLC)879591762

Library Locations

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