Coverart for item
The Resource Moralia, Plutarch ; general index by Edward N. O'Neil, (electronic resource)

Moralia, Plutarch ; general index by Edward N. O'Neil, (electronic resource)

Label
Moralia
Title
Moralia
Statement of responsibility
Plutarch ; general index by Edward N. O'Neil
Creator
Contributor
Author
Compiler
Translator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • grc
  • grc
  • eng
Summary
Plutarch (c. 45-120 CE) wrote on many subjects. His extant works other than the Parallel Lives are varied, about sixty in number, and known as the Moralia (Moral Essays). They reflect his philosophy about living a good life, and provide a treasury of information concerning Greco-Roman society, traditions, ideals, ethics, and religion.
Member of
Assigning source
Provided by Publisher
Cataloging source
MaCbHUP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Plutarch
Language note
Text in Greek with English translation on facing pages
Literary form
essays
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1904-1987
  • 1913-2006
  • 1906-1978
  • 1859-1955
  • 1908-1969
  • 1905-1981
  • 1915-1985
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Babbitt, Frank Cole
  • Cherniss, Harold F.
  • Clement, Paul A.
  • De Lacy, Phillip
  • Einarson, Benedict
  • Fowler, Harold North
  • Helmbold, W. C.
  • Hoffleit, Herbert B.
  • Minar, Edwin L.
  • O'Neil, Edward N.
  • Pearson, Lionel
  • Sandbach, F. H.
Series statement
Loeb classical library online
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Ethics
  • Ethics, Ancient
Summary expansion
Plutarch (Plutarchus), ca. 45-120 CE, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia in central Greece, studied philosophy at Athens, and, after coming to Rome as a teacher in philosophy, was given consular rank by the emperor Trajan and a procuratorship in Greece by Hadrian. He was married and the father of one daughter and four sons. He appears as a man of kindly character and independent thought, studious and learned. Plutarch wrote on many subjects. Most popular have always been the 46 Parallel Lives, biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs (in each pair, one Greek figure and one similar Roman), though the last four lives are single. All are invaluable sources of our knowledge of the lives and characters of Greek and Roman statesmen, soldiers and orators. Plutarch's many other varied extant works, about 60 in number, are known as Moralia or Moral Essays. They are of high literary value, besides being of great use to people interested in philosophy, ethics and religion. The Loeb Classical Library edition of the Moralia is in fifteen volumes, volume XIII having two parts--
Target audience
general
Label
Moralia, Plutarch ; general index by Edward N. O'Neil, (electronic resource)
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Includes indexes
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
v. I. The education of children. How the young man should study poetry. On listening to lectures. How to lell a flatterer from a friend. How a man may become aware of his progress in virtue / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. II. How to profit by one's enemies. On having many friends. Chance. Virtue and vice. Letter of condolence to Apollonius. Advice about keeping well. Advice to bride and groom. The dinner of the seven wise men. Superstition / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. III. Sayings of kings and commanders. Sayings of Romans. Sayings of Spartans. The ancient customs of the Spartans. Sayings of Spartan women. Bravery of women / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. IV. Roman questions. Greek questions. Greek and Roman parallel stories. On the fortune of the Romans. On the fortune or the virtue of Alexander. Were the Athenians more famous in war or in wisdom? / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. V. Isis and Osiris. The E at Delphi. The oracles at Delphi no longer given in verse. The obsolescence of oracles / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. VI. Can virtue be taught? On moral virtue. On the control of anger. On tranquility of mind. On brotherly love. On affection for offspring. Whether vice be sufficient to cause unhappiness. Whether the affections of the soul are worse than those of the body. Concerning talkativeness. On being a busybody / with an English translation by W.C. Helmbold -- v. VII. On love of wealth. On compliancy. On envy and hate. On praising oneself inoffensively. On the delays of the divine vengeance. On fate. On the sign of Socrates. On exile. Consolation to his wife / with an English translation by Phillip H. De Lacy and Benedict Einarson -- v. VIII. Table-talk, books 1-6 / with an English translation by Paul A. Clement and Herbert B. Hoffleit -- v. IX. Table-talk, books 7-9. Dialogue on love / with an English translation by Edwin L. Minar, Jr., F.H. Sandbach, and W.C. Helmbold -- v. X. Love stories. That a philosopher ought to converse especially with men in power. To an uneducated ruler. Whether an old man should engage in public affairs. Precepts of statecraft. On monarchy, democracy, and oligarchy. That we ought not to borrow. Lives of the ten orators. Summary of a comparison between Aristophanes and Menander / with an English translation by Harold North Fowler -- v. XI. On the malice of Herodotus. Causes of natural phenomena / with an English translation by Lionel Pearson and F.H. Sandbach -- v. XII. Concerning the face which appears in the orb of the moon. On the principle of cold. Whether fire or water is more useful. Whether land or sea animals are cleverer. Beasts are rational. On the eating of flesh / with an English translation by Harold Cherniss and William C. Helmbold -- v. XIII. Part 1: Platonic essays / with an English translation by Harold Cherniss -- v. XIII. Part 2: Stoic essays / with an English translation by Harold Cherniss -- v. XIV. That Epicurus actually makes a pleasant life impossible. Reply to Colotes in defence of the other philosophers. Is "live unknown" a wise precept? On music / with an English translation by Benedict Einarson and Phillip H. De Lacy-- v. XV. Fragments / with an English translation by F.H. Sandbach -- v. XVI. Index / compiled by Edward N. O'Neil
Control code
hup0000297
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Use of this electronic resource may be governed by a license agreement which restricts use to the European University Institute community. Each user is responsible for limiting use to individual, non-commercial purposes, without systematically downloading, distributing, or retaining substantial portions of information, provided that all copyright and other proprietary notices contained on the materials are retained. The use of software, including scripts, agents, or robots, is generally prohibited and may result in the loss of access to these resources for the entire European University Institute community
Isbn
9780674994669
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)903198792
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web
Label
Moralia, Plutarch ; general index by Edward N. O'Neil, (electronic resource)
Link
Publication
Note
Includes indexes
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
v. I. The education of children. How the young man should study poetry. On listening to lectures. How to lell a flatterer from a friend. How a man may become aware of his progress in virtue / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. II. How to profit by one's enemies. On having many friends. Chance. Virtue and vice. Letter of condolence to Apollonius. Advice about keeping well. Advice to bride and groom. The dinner of the seven wise men. Superstition / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. III. Sayings of kings and commanders. Sayings of Romans. Sayings of Spartans. The ancient customs of the Spartans. Sayings of Spartan women. Bravery of women / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. IV. Roman questions. Greek questions. Greek and Roman parallel stories. On the fortune of the Romans. On the fortune or the virtue of Alexander. Were the Athenians more famous in war or in wisdom? / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. V. Isis and Osiris. The E at Delphi. The oracles at Delphi no longer given in verse. The obsolescence of oracles / with an English translation by Frank Cole Babbitt -- v. VI. Can virtue be taught? On moral virtue. On the control of anger. On tranquility of mind. On brotherly love. On affection for offspring. Whether vice be sufficient to cause unhappiness. Whether the affections of the soul are worse than those of the body. Concerning talkativeness. On being a busybody / with an English translation by W.C. Helmbold -- v. VII. On love of wealth. On compliancy. On envy and hate. On praising oneself inoffensively. On the delays of the divine vengeance. On fate. On the sign of Socrates. On exile. Consolation to his wife / with an English translation by Phillip H. De Lacy and Benedict Einarson -- v. VIII. Table-talk, books 1-6 / with an English translation by Paul A. Clement and Herbert B. Hoffleit -- v. IX. Table-talk, books 7-9. Dialogue on love / with an English translation by Edwin L. Minar, Jr., F.H. Sandbach, and W.C. Helmbold -- v. X. Love stories. That a philosopher ought to converse especially with men in power. To an uneducated ruler. Whether an old man should engage in public affairs. Precepts of statecraft. On monarchy, democracy, and oligarchy. That we ought not to borrow. Lives of the ten orators. Summary of a comparison between Aristophanes and Menander / with an English translation by Harold North Fowler -- v. XI. On the malice of Herodotus. Causes of natural phenomena / with an English translation by Lionel Pearson and F.H. Sandbach -- v. XII. Concerning the face which appears in the orb of the moon. On the principle of cold. Whether fire or water is more useful. Whether land or sea animals are cleverer. Beasts are rational. On the eating of flesh / with an English translation by Harold Cherniss and William C. Helmbold -- v. XIII. Part 1: Platonic essays / with an English translation by Harold Cherniss -- v. XIII. Part 2: Stoic essays / with an English translation by Harold Cherniss -- v. XIV. That Epicurus actually makes a pleasant life impossible. Reply to Colotes in defence of the other philosophers. Is "live unknown" a wise precept? On music / with an English translation by Benedict Einarson and Phillip H. De Lacy-- v. XV. Fragments / with an English translation by F.H. Sandbach -- v. XVI. Index / compiled by Edward N. O'Neil
Control code
hup0000297
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Use of this electronic resource may be governed by a license agreement which restricts use to the European University Institute community. Each user is responsible for limiting use to individual, non-commercial purposes, without systematically downloading, distributing, or retaining substantial portions of information, provided that all copyright and other proprietary notices contained on the materials are retained. The use of software, including scripts, agents, or robots, is generally prohibited and may result in the loss of access to these resources for the entire European University Institute community
Isbn
9780674994669
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)903198792
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web

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