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The Resource Madness and the demand for recognition : a philosophical inquiry into identity and mental health activism, Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed, Wellcome Trust ISSF Research Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom; Visiting Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, King's College London, United Kingdom

Madness and the demand for recognition : a philosophical inquiry into identity and mental health activism, Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed, Wellcome Trust ISSF Research Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom; Visiting Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, King's College London, United Kingdom

Label
Madness and the demand for recognition : a philosophical inquiry into identity and mental health activism
Title
Madness and the demand for recognition
Title remainder
a philosophical inquiry into identity and mental health activism
Statement of responsibility
Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed, Wellcome Trust ISSF Research Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom; Visiting Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, King's College London, United Kingdom
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Madness is a complex and contested term. Through time and across cultures, it has acquired many formulations: for some, madness is synonymous with unreason and violence, for others with creativity and subversion, and elsewhere it is associated with spirits and spirituality. Among the different formulations, there is one in particular that has taken hold so deeply and systematically that it has become the default view in many communities around the world: the idea that madness is a disorder of the mind. Contemporary developments in mental health activism pose a radical challenge to psychiatric and societal understandings of madness. Mad Pride and mad-positive activism reject the language of mental "illness" and "disorder," reclaim the term "mad," and reverse its negative connotations. Activists seek cultural change in the way madness is viewed, demanding recognition of madness as grounds for identity. But can madness constitute such grounds? Is it possible to understand delusions, passivity phenomena, and the discontinuity of self often seen in mental health conditions, as components of a person's identity rather than a disorder? How should society respond? Locating itself in the philosophical literature on identity and recognition, and in the philosophy of psychiatry. mad studies and activist literatures, this book is the first comprehensive philosophical examination of the claims and demands of Mad activism. It develops a rich theoretical framework for understanding, justifying, and responding to Mad activism's demand for recognition. --
Member of
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Rashed, Mohammed Abouelleil,
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
International perspectives in philosophy and psychiatry
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Mental illness
  • Psychiatry
  • Social movements
Label
Madness and the demand for recognition : a philosophical inquiry into identity and mental health activism, Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed, Wellcome Trust ISSF Research Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom; Visiting Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, King's College London, United Kingdom
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 229-243) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction. Part 1 Madness. 1 Mental health activism and the demand for recognition : Introduction -- A brief historical account of activism in mental health -- The meaning of madness -- Mad Pride -- Philosophical engagement with Mad Pride discourse -- Next steps. 2 The problem of distress and disability : INtroduction -- Disability -- Distress -- Conclusion. Part 2 Recognition. 3 The concept of recognition and the problem of freedom : Introduction -- What is it to be a free agent? Moral duty vs. ethical life -- The conceptual structure of recognition in the Phenomenology of Spirit -- What kind of concept is the concept of recognition? -- What reasons do we have to accept the concept of recognition? -- Conclusion. 4 Identity and the psychological consequences of recognition : Introduction -- Identity -- The struggle for recognition -- Psychological consequences of recognition -- Conclusion. 5 Misrecognition: political reform or reconciliation : Introduction -- Misrecognition as a social harm -- Misrecognition and political reform -- Misrecognition and reconciliation -- Responding to misrecognition: a role for political reform and reconciliation -- Conclusion. Part 3 Routes to recognition. 6 Mad culture : Introduction -- What is culture? -- Can madness constitute a culture? -- Routes to cultural rights -- Conclusion. 7 Mad identity I: controversial and failed identities : Introduction -- The distinction between failed and controversial identities -- Delusional identities -- A methodology for distinguishing failed from controversial identities -- Conclusion. 8 Mad identity II: unity and continuity of self : Introduction -- (Dis)unity of self -- (Dis)continuity of self -- Conclusion. 9 Madness and the limits of recognition : Introduction -- The limits of recognition -- Narratives of madness -- Overcoming impairments to identify formation -- Making the difference between subjective narratives and Mad narratives -- Conclusion. Part 4 Approaches to Mad activism. 10 Responding to the demand for recognition of Mad identity : Introduction -- Normative force of demands for recognition (a précis of part II) -- Does the demand for recognition of Mad identity possess normative force? -- Responding to misrecognition -- Mad narratives and the cultural repertoire -- Conclusion. 11 Conclusion: pathways to reconciliation : Reconciling sceptics and supporters -- Reconciling madness and society. References -- Author index -- Subject index
Control code
on1053904365
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
257 pages
Isbn
9780198786863
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1053904365
Label
Madness and the demand for recognition : a philosophical inquiry into identity and mental health activism, Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed, Wellcome Trust ISSF Research Fellow, Department of Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom; Visiting Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, King's College London, United Kingdom
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 229-243) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction. Part 1 Madness. 1 Mental health activism and the demand for recognition : Introduction -- A brief historical account of activism in mental health -- The meaning of madness -- Mad Pride -- Philosophical engagement with Mad Pride discourse -- Next steps. 2 The problem of distress and disability : INtroduction -- Disability -- Distress -- Conclusion. Part 2 Recognition. 3 The concept of recognition and the problem of freedom : Introduction -- What is it to be a free agent? Moral duty vs. ethical life -- The conceptual structure of recognition in the Phenomenology of Spirit -- What kind of concept is the concept of recognition? -- What reasons do we have to accept the concept of recognition? -- Conclusion. 4 Identity and the psychological consequences of recognition : Introduction -- Identity -- The struggle for recognition -- Psychological consequences of recognition -- Conclusion. 5 Misrecognition: political reform or reconciliation : Introduction -- Misrecognition as a social harm -- Misrecognition and political reform -- Misrecognition and reconciliation -- Responding to misrecognition: a role for political reform and reconciliation -- Conclusion. Part 3 Routes to recognition. 6 Mad culture : Introduction -- What is culture? -- Can madness constitute a culture? -- Routes to cultural rights -- Conclusion. 7 Mad identity I: controversial and failed identities : Introduction -- The distinction between failed and controversial identities -- Delusional identities -- A methodology for distinguishing failed from controversial identities -- Conclusion. 8 Mad identity II: unity and continuity of self : Introduction -- (Dis)unity of self -- (Dis)continuity of self -- Conclusion. 9 Madness and the limits of recognition : Introduction -- The limits of recognition -- Narratives of madness -- Overcoming impairments to identify formation -- Making the difference between subjective narratives and Mad narratives -- Conclusion. Part 4 Approaches to Mad activism. 10 Responding to the demand for recognition of Mad identity : Introduction -- Normative force of demands for recognition (a précis of part II) -- Does the demand for recognition of Mad identity possess normative force? -- Responding to misrecognition -- Mad narratives and the cultural repertoire -- Conclusion. 11 Conclusion: pathways to reconciliation : Reconciling sceptics and supporters -- Reconciling madness and society. References -- Author index -- Subject index
Control code
on1053904365
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
257 pages
Isbn
9780198786863
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1053904365

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