Coverart for item
The Resource Judicial review in new democracies : constitutional courts in Asian cases, Tom Ginsburg, (electronic resource)

Judicial review in new democracies : constitutional courts in Asian cases, Tom Ginsburg, (electronic resource)

Label
Judicial review in new democracies : constitutional courts in Asian cases
Title
Judicial review in new democracies
Title remainder
constitutional courts in Asian cases
Statement of responsibility
Tom Ginsburg
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
New democracies around the world have adopted constitutional courts to oversee the operation of democratic politics. Where does judicial power come from, how does it develop in the early stages of democratic liberalization, and what political conditions support its expansion? This book answers these questions through an examination of three constitutional courts in Asia: Taiwan, Korea, and Mongolia. In a region that has traditionally viewed law as a tool of authoritarian rulers, constitutional courts in these three societies are becoming a real constraint on government. In contrast with conventional culturalist accounts, this book argues that the design and functioning of constitutional review are largely a function of politics and interests. Judicial review - the power of judges to rule an act of a legislature or national leader unconstitutional - is a solution to the problem of uncertainty in constitutional design. By providing 'insurance' to prospective electoral losers, judicial review can facilitate democracy.--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
UkCbUP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Ginsburg, Tom
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Cambridge Social Sciences eBooks
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Constitutional courts
  • Judicial review
  • Judicial power
  • Democratization
Label
Judicial review in new democracies : constitutional courts in Asian cases, Tom Ginsburg, (electronic resource)
Link
https://eui.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511511189
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction: the decline and fall of parliamentary sovereignty -- Why judicial review? -- Constituting judicial power -- Building judicial power -- Courts in new democracies -- Confucian constitutionalism? The grand justices of the Republic of China -- Distorting democracy? The constitutional court of Mongolia -- Rule by law or rule of law? The constitutional court of Korea -- Conclusion: comparing constitutional courts
Control code
CR9780511511189
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 295 pages)
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Use of this electronic resource may be governed by a license agreement which restricts use to the European University Institute community. Each user is responsible for limiting use to individual, non-commercial purposes, without systematically downloading, distributing, or retaining substantial portions of information, provided that all copyright and other proprietary notices contained on the materials are retained. The use of software, including scripts, agents, or robots, is generally prohibited and may result in the loss of access to these resources for the entire European University Institute community
Isbn
9780521520393
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
digital, PDF file(s).
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)57229456
Label
Judicial review in new democracies : constitutional courts in Asian cases, Tom Ginsburg, (electronic resource)
Link
https://eui.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511511189
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction: the decline and fall of parliamentary sovereignty -- Why judicial review? -- Constituting judicial power -- Building judicial power -- Courts in new democracies -- Confucian constitutionalism? The grand justices of the Republic of China -- Distorting democracy? The constitutional court of Mongolia -- Rule by law or rule of law? The constitutional court of Korea -- Conclusion: comparing constitutional courts
Control code
CR9780511511189
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 295 pages)
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Use of this electronic resource may be governed by a license agreement which restricts use to the European University Institute community. Each user is responsible for limiting use to individual, non-commercial purposes, without systematically downloading, distributing, or retaining substantial portions of information, provided that all copyright and other proprietary notices contained on the materials are retained. The use of software, including scripts, agents, or robots, is generally prohibited and may result in the loss of access to these resources for the entire European University Institute community
Isbn
9780521520393
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
digital, PDF file(s).
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)57229456

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