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The Resource Hidden power : the strategic logic of organized crime, James Cockayne

Hidden power : the strategic logic of organized crime, James Cockayne

Label
Hidden power : the strategic logic of organized crime
Title
Hidden power
Title remainder
the strategic logic of organized crime
Statement of responsibility
James Cockayne
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
YDX
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cockayne, James
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Organized crime
Label
Hidden power : the strategic logic of organized crime, James Cockayne
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 325-447) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 2.
  • Gangsterismo
  • A joint venture in government
  • The Havana Mob
  • Rebellion in the Mob
  • Revolution in Cuba
  • Conclusion
  • 9.
  • The Blue Caribbean Ocean, 1959 -- 1983
  • `A gangland style killing'
  • Accommodation or confrontation?
  • The Strategic Organization of Crime
  • Internationalizing Murder, Inc.
  • Seeking protection
  • Subversion and its unintended consequences
  • What went wrong at the Bay of Pigs?
  • Learning from the Mob?
  • Cold War wildcard: the Missile Crisis
  • Did the magic button backfire?
  • The Bahamas and the birth of offshore capitalism
  • Invading Haiti
  • Casino capitalism
  • What do we know about political-criminal interaction?
  • Ballots, not bullets
  • Epilogue: a city by the Atlantic
  • Conclusion
  • pt. THREE
  • THE MARKET FOR GOVERNMENT
  • 10.
  • Strategic Criminal Positioning
  • The market for government
  • Intermediation: mafia logic
  • Autonomy: warlordism and gang rule
  • Criminal strategy and governmental power
  • Merger: joint ventures
  • Strategic alliances
  • Terrorism as criminal positioning strategy
  • Relocation and blue ocean strategy
  • 11.
  • Innovation, Disruption and Strategy beyond the State
  • Innovation and disruption
  • Mexico: from narcocartels to narcocults
  • The shifting sands of the Sahel
  • The disruption of sovereignty
  • Individual, network or organizational strategy?
  • Implications
  • War and strategy beyond the state
  • Combating criminal governmentality
  • Managing criminal spoilers in peace and transition processes
  • Envoi: the rise of criminal statecraft
  • Social bandits and primitive criminal strategy
  • Criminal capabilities
  • Coercion
  • Corruption
  • Communications
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Command and control
  • Conclusion
  • pt. TWO
  • EPISODES IN CRIMINAL STRATEGY
  • 3.
  • Tammany: `How New York is Governed', 1869 -- 1920
  • New York's government: machine made
  • Guardians of the Revolution
  • Gangs of New York
  • The ghost in the machine
  • pt. ONE
  • Boss Tweed: Lord of the Kings
  • A quest for influence
  • Monarch of Manhattan
  • Downfall
  • Honest graft
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Mafia Origins, 1859 -- 1929
  • Origins
  • Profiting from transition
  • A STRATEGIC APPROACH TO ORGANIZED CRIME
  • Organizing the Sicilian mafia
  • Mafia migration
  • The Black Hand
  • Modern Family
  • Illicit government
  • The Iron Prefect
  • Conclusion
  • 5.
  • War and Peace in the American Mafia, 1920 -- 1941
  • War
  • 1.
  • Prohibition as a driver of innovation
  • Civil war in the American mafia
  • Mediation and betrayal
  • Peace
  • Five Families
  • Coup d'etat
  • A new governmental approach
  • Consolidating power
  • Racketeering and union power
  • Gambling innovation and political finance
  • Introduction
  • Fall of a czar
  • Playing kingmaker
  • Mobbing up
  • The Boy Scout
  • Conclusion
  • 6.
  • The Underworld Project, 1941 -- 1943
  • `This is a war'
  • Enlisting the underworld
  • Regular guys
  • Making sense of criminal power
  • Lucky's break
  • From watchdog to attack dog
  • Invading Italy
  • Local knowledge
  • Creating a fifth column
  • Release and exile
  • Conclusion
  • 7.
  • Governing Sicily, 1942 -- 1968
  • `A bargain has been struck'
  • Entering a gallery of mirrors
  • Black market rents
  • "Wine and women and champagne'
  • `Our good friends'
  • Mafia separatism
  • Confrontation, accommodation or withdrawal?
  • The logic of mafia separatism
  • Seeking Great Power protection
  • Negotiating peace with the mafia
  • A bandit army
  • Settlement and betrayal
  • About this book
  • Negotiating Sicily's transition
  • A Sicilian political machine
  • Wisdom of the Mob
  • The sack of Palermo
  • Conclusion
  • 8.
  • The Cuba Joint Venture, 1933 -- 1958
  • Buying into Cuba
  • Rise of a strongman
  • The `Batista Palace Gang'
Control code
ocn958779630
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
xix, 476 pages
Isbn
9781849046350
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)958779630
Label
Hidden power : the strategic logic of organized crime, James Cockayne
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 325-447) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 2.
  • Gangsterismo
  • A joint venture in government
  • The Havana Mob
  • Rebellion in the Mob
  • Revolution in Cuba
  • Conclusion
  • 9.
  • The Blue Caribbean Ocean, 1959 -- 1983
  • `A gangland style killing'
  • Accommodation or confrontation?
  • The Strategic Organization of Crime
  • Internationalizing Murder, Inc.
  • Seeking protection
  • Subversion and its unintended consequences
  • What went wrong at the Bay of Pigs?
  • Learning from the Mob?
  • Cold War wildcard: the Missile Crisis
  • Did the magic button backfire?
  • The Bahamas and the birth of offshore capitalism
  • Invading Haiti
  • Casino capitalism
  • What do we know about political-criminal interaction?
  • Ballots, not bullets
  • Epilogue: a city by the Atlantic
  • Conclusion
  • pt. THREE
  • THE MARKET FOR GOVERNMENT
  • 10.
  • Strategic Criminal Positioning
  • The market for government
  • Intermediation: mafia logic
  • Autonomy: warlordism and gang rule
  • Criminal strategy and governmental power
  • Merger: joint ventures
  • Strategic alliances
  • Terrorism as criminal positioning strategy
  • Relocation and blue ocean strategy
  • 11.
  • Innovation, Disruption and Strategy beyond the State
  • Innovation and disruption
  • Mexico: from narcocartels to narcocults
  • The shifting sands of the Sahel
  • The disruption of sovereignty
  • Individual, network or organizational strategy?
  • Implications
  • War and strategy beyond the state
  • Combating criminal governmentality
  • Managing criminal spoilers in peace and transition processes
  • Envoi: the rise of criminal statecraft
  • Social bandits and primitive criminal strategy
  • Criminal capabilities
  • Coercion
  • Corruption
  • Communications
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Command and control
  • Conclusion
  • pt. TWO
  • EPISODES IN CRIMINAL STRATEGY
  • 3.
  • Tammany: `How New York is Governed', 1869 -- 1920
  • New York's government: machine made
  • Guardians of the Revolution
  • Gangs of New York
  • The ghost in the machine
  • pt. ONE
  • Boss Tweed: Lord of the Kings
  • A quest for influence
  • Monarch of Manhattan
  • Downfall
  • Honest graft
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Mafia Origins, 1859 -- 1929
  • Origins
  • Profiting from transition
  • A STRATEGIC APPROACH TO ORGANIZED CRIME
  • Organizing the Sicilian mafia
  • Mafia migration
  • The Black Hand
  • Modern Family
  • Illicit government
  • The Iron Prefect
  • Conclusion
  • 5.
  • War and Peace in the American Mafia, 1920 -- 1941
  • War
  • 1.
  • Prohibition as a driver of innovation
  • Civil war in the American mafia
  • Mediation and betrayal
  • Peace
  • Five Families
  • Coup d'etat
  • A new governmental approach
  • Consolidating power
  • Racketeering and union power
  • Gambling innovation and political finance
  • Introduction
  • Fall of a czar
  • Playing kingmaker
  • Mobbing up
  • The Boy Scout
  • Conclusion
  • 6.
  • The Underworld Project, 1941 -- 1943
  • `This is a war'
  • Enlisting the underworld
  • Regular guys
  • Making sense of criminal power
  • Lucky's break
  • From watchdog to attack dog
  • Invading Italy
  • Local knowledge
  • Creating a fifth column
  • Release and exile
  • Conclusion
  • 7.
  • Governing Sicily, 1942 -- 1968
  • `A bargain has been struck'
  • Entering a gallery of mirrors
  • Black market rents
  • "Wine and women and champagne'
  • `Our good friends'
  • Mafia separatism
  • Confrontation, accommodation or withdrawal?
  • The logic of mafia separatism
  • Seeking Great Power protection
  • Negotiating peace with the mafia
  • A bandit army
  • Settlement and betrayal
  • About this book
  • Negotiating Sicily's transition
  • A Sicilian political machine
  • Wisdom of the Mob
  • The sack of Palermo
  • Conclusion
  • 8.
  • The Cuba Joint Venture, 1933 -- 1958
  • Buying into Cuba
  • Rise of a strongman
  • The `Batista Palace Gang'
Control code
ocn958779630
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
xix, 476 pages
Isbn
9781849046350
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)958779630

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