Coverart for item
The Resource Economics and the environment, Eban S. Goodstein

Economics and the environment, Eban S. Goodstein

Label
Economics and the environment
Title
Economics and the environment
Statement of responsibility
Eban S. Goodstein
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
IT-FiEUI
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1960-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Goodstein, Eban S.
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Economic development
Label
Economics and the environment, Eban S. Goodstein
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
  • Introduction -- 1.
  • Four economic questions about global warming -- 1.0. Introduction -- 1.1. How much pollution is too much? -- 1.2. Is government up to the job? -- 1.3. How can we do better? -- 1.4. Can we resolve global issues? -- 1.5. Summary --
  • pt. I.
  • How much pollution is too much? -- 2. Ethics and economics -- 2.0. Introduction -- 2.1. Utility and utilitarianism -- 2.2. Social welfare -- 2.3. Summary -- 3. Pollution and resource degradation as externalities -- 3.0. Introduction -- 3.1. The open access problem -- 3.2. The public goods problem -- 3.3. Summary -- Appendix 3A. Overfishing, ITQs, and aquaculture -- 4. The efficiency standard -- 4.0. Introduction -- 4.1. Efficiency defined -- 4.2. Efficient pollution levels -- 4.3. Marginals and totals -- 4.4. The Coase theorem introduced -- 4.5. Air pollution control in Baltimore : calculating the efficient standard -- 4.6. The ethical basis of the efficiency standard -- 4.7. Summary -- 5. The safety standard -- 5.0. Introduction -- 5.1. Defining the right to safety -- 5.2. The safety standard : inefficient -- 5.3. The safety standard : not cost-effective -- 5.4. The safety standard : regressive? -- 5.5. Siting hazardous waste facilities : safety versus efficiency -- 5.6. Summary -- 6. Sustainability : a neoclassical view -- 6.0. Introduction -- 6.1. Measuring sustainability : net national welfare -- 6.2. Natural capital depreciation -- 6.3. Future benefits, costs, and discounting -- 6.4. An example of discounting : lightbulbs -- 6.5. Choosing the "right" discount rate for pollution control -- 6.6. Social discounting versus market discounting -- 6.7. Summary -- Appendix 6A. Nonrenewable resource economics 101 -- 7. Sustainability : an ecological view -- 7.0. Introduction -- 7.1. Malthus and ecological economics -- 7.2. Measuring sustainability -- 7.3. The precautionary principle -- 7.4. Markets, governments, and the EIS -- 7.5. The ecological-neoclassical debate in context -- 7.6. Summary -- Appendix 7A. Game theory and the safe minimum standard -- 8. Measuring the benefits of environmental protection -- 8.0. Introduction -- 8.1. Use, option, and existence value : types of nonmarket benefits -- 8.2. Consumer surplus, WTP, and WTA : measuring benefits -- 8.3. Risk : assessment and perception -- 8.4. Measuring benefits I : contingent valuation -- 8.5. Measuring benefits II : travel cost -- 8.6. Measuring benefits III : Hedonic regression -- 8.7. The value of human life -- 8.8. Summary -- Appendix. 8A. WTA and WTP redux -- 9. Measuring the costs of environmental protection -- 9.0. Introduction -- 9.1. Engineering costs -- 9.2. Productivity impacts of regulation -- 9.3. Employment impacts of regulation -- 9.4. Monopoly costs -- 9.5. General equilibrium effects -- 9.6. Summary -- 10. Benefit-cost in practice : implementing the efficiency standard -- 10.0. Introduction -- 10.1. Doing benefit-cost : lead standards -- 10.2. Doing benefit-cost : landfill regulation -- 10.3. Political influence in benefit-cost -- 10.4. Is benefit-cost up to the job? -- 10.5. Summary -- 11. Is more really better? : consumption and welfare -- 11.0. Introduction -- 11.1. Money and happiness -- 11.2. Social norms and the rat race -- 11.3. Positional goods and consumption externalities -- 11.4. Welfare with social consumption -- 11.5. Controlling the impact of consumption -- 11.6. Summary --
  • pt. II.
  • Is government up to the job? -- 12. The political economy of environmental regulation -- 12.0. Introduction -- 12.1. The process of environmental regulation -- 12.2. Regulation under imperfect information -- 12.3. Bureaucratic discretion and political influence -- 12.4. Who wins the influence game? -- 12.5. Political reform of regulation -- 12.6. Better information, more democracy -- 12.7. Summary -- 13. An overview of environmental legislation -- 13.0. Introduction -- 13.1. Cleaning the air -- 13.2. Fishable and swimmable waters -- 13.3. Hazardous waste disposal on land -- 13.4. Chemicals and pesticides -- 13.5. Endangered species protection -- 13.6. Summary -- 14. The regulatory record : achievements and obstacles -- 14.0. Introduction -- 14.1. Accomplishments of environmental regulation -- 14.2. Normative criticism of regulation -- 14.3. Cost-effectiveness criticisms of regulation -- 14.4. Beyond regulation? : promoting clean technology -- 14.5. Summary -- 15. Monitoring and enforcement -- 15.0. Introduction -- 15.1. The economics of crime -- 15.2. The economics of punishment -- 15.3. The compliance record -- 15.4. The political economy of enforcement -- 15.5. Citizen enforcement -- 15.6. Cost-effective enforcement -- 15.7. Summary --
  • pt. III.
  • How can we do better? -- 16. Incentive-based regulation : theory -- 16.0. Introduction -- 16.1. The cost-effectiveness rule -- 16.2. IB regulation and cost-effectiveness -- 16.3. IB regulation and technological progress -- 16.4. Potential problems with IB regulation -- 16.5. Summary -- Appendix 16A. Imperfect regulation in an uncertain world -- Appendix 16B. Incentive-compatible regulation -- 17. Incentive-based regulation : practice -- 17.0. Introduction -- 17.1. Lead and chlorofluorocarbons -- 17.2. Trading urban air pollutants -- 17.3. Marketable permits and acid rain -- 17.4. Recent US cap-and-trade moves : carbon dioxide and mercury? -- 17.5. Pollution taxes and their relatives in the United States -- 17.6. Carbon drolide trading and taxes in Europe -- 17.7. Summary -- 18. promoting clean technology : theory -- 18.0. Introduction -- 18.1. Path dependence and clean technology -- 18.2. Clean technology defined -- 18.3. If you're so smart, why aren't you rich? -- 18.4. Picking the winning path -- 18.5. Promoting small-scale CTs -- 18.6 Promoting large-scale CTs -- 18.7. Clean technology : two case studies -- 18.8. Summary -- 19. Energy policy and the environment -- 19.0. Introduction -- 19.1. Technology options : electricity and heat -- 19.2. Policy options : electricity and heat -- 19.3. Technology options : transport -- 19.4. Policy options : transport -- 19.5. Slowing global warming at a profit? -- 19.6. Summary --
  • pt. IV.
  • Can we resolve global issues? -- 20. Poverty, population, and the environment -- 20.0. Introduction -- 20.1. Poverty and the environment -- 20.2. The population picture in perspective -- 20.3. An economic approach to family size -- 20.4. Controlling population growth -- 20.5. Consumption and the global environment -- 20.6. Envisioning a sustainable future -- 20.7. Summary -- 21. Environmental policy in poor countries -- 21.0. Introduction -- 21.1. The political economy of sustainable development -- 21.2. Ending environmentally damaging subsidies -- 21.3. Establishing and enforcing property rights -- 21.4. Regulatory approaches -- 21.5. Sustainable technology : development and transfer -- 21.6. Resource conservation and debt relief -- 21.7. Trade and the environment -- 21.8. Summary -- 22. The economics of global agreements -- 22.0. Introduction -- 22.1. Agreements as public goods -- 22.2. Monitoring and enforcement -- 22.3. The ozone layer and biodiversity -- 22.4 Stopping global warning : theory -- 22.5. Stopping global warming : reality -- 22.6 Summary
Control code
FIEb13873155
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
Fifth edition.
Extent
xvi, 512 pages
Isbn
9780471763093
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)76940056
Label
Economics and the environment, Eban S. Goodstein
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
  • Introduction -- 1.
  • Four economic questions about global warming -- 1.0. Introduction -- 1.1. How much pollution is too much? -- 1.2. Is government up to the job? -- 1.3. How can we do better? -- 1.4. Can we resolve global issues? -- 1.5. Summary --
  • pt. I.
  • How much pollution is too much? -- 2. Ethics and economics -- 2.0. Introduction -- 2.1. Utility and utilitarianism -- 2.2. Social welfare -- 2.3. Summary -- 3. Pollution and resource degradation as externalities -- 3.0. Introduction -- 3.1. The open access problem -- 3.2. The public goods problem -- 3.3. Summary -- Appendix 3A. Overfishing, ITQs, and aquaculture -- 4. The efficiency standard -- 4.0. Introduction -- 4.1. Efficiency defined -- 4.2. Efficient pollution levels -- 4.3. Marginals and totals -- 4.4. The Coase theorem introduced -- 4.5. Air pollution control in Baltimore : calculating the efficient standard -- 4.6. The ethical basis of the efficiency standard -- 4.7. Summary -- 5. The safety standard -- 5.0. Introduction -- 5.1. Defining the right to safety -- 5.2. The safety standard : inefficient -- 5.3. The safety standard : not cost-effective -- 5.4. The safety standard : regressive? -- 5.5. Siting hazardous waste facilities : safety versus efficiency -- 5.6. Summary -- 6. Sustainability : a neoclassical view -- 6.0. Introduction -- 6.1. Measuring sustainability : net national welfare -- 6.2. Natural capital depreciation -- 6.3. Future benefits, costs, and discounting -- 6.4. An example of discounting : lightbulbs -- 6.5. Choosing the "right" discount rate for pollution control -- 6.6. Social discounting versus market discounting -- 6.7. Summary -- Appendix 6A. Nonrenewable resource economics 101 -- 7. Sustainability : an ecological view -- 7.0. Introduction -- 7.1. Malthus and ecological economics -- 7.2. Measuring sustainability -- 7.3. The precautionary principle -- 7.4. Markets, governments, and the EIS -- 7.5. The ecological-neoclassical debate in context -- 7.6. Summary -- Appendix 7A. Game theory and the safe minimum standard -- 8. Measuring the benefits of environmental protection -- 8.0. Introduction -- 8.1. Use, option, and existence value : types of nonmarket benefits -- 8.2. Consumer surplus, WTP, and WTA : measuring benefits -- 8.3. Risk : assessment and perception -- 8.4. Measuring benefits I : contingent valuation -- 8.5. Measuring benefits II : travel cost -- 8.6. Measuring benefits III : Hedonic regression -- 8.7. The value of human life -- 8.8. Summary -- Appendix. 8A. WTA and WTP redux -- 9. Measuring the costs of environmental protection -- 9.0. Introduction -- 9.1. Engineering costs -- 9.2. Productivity impacts of regulation -- 9.3. Employment impacts of regulation -- 9.4. Monopoly costs -- 9.5. General equilibrium effects -- 9.6. Summary -- 10. Benefit-cost in practice : implementing the efficiency standard -- 10.0. Introduction -- 10.1. Doing benefit-cost : lead standards -- 10.2. Doing benefit-cost : landfill regulation -- 10.3. Political influence in benefit-cost -- 10.4. Is benefit-cost up to the job? -- 10.5. Summary -- 11. Is more really better? : consumption and welfare -- 11.0. Introduction -- 11.1. Money and happiness -- 11.2. Social norms and the rat race -- 11.3. Positional goods and consumption externalities -- 11.4. Welfare with social consumption -- 11.5. Controlling the impact of consumption -- 11.6. Summary --
  • pt. II.
  • Is government up to the job? -- 12. The political economy of environmental regulation -- 12.0. Introduction -- 12.1. The process of environmental regulation -- 12.2. Regulation under imperfect information -- 12.3. Bureaucratic discretion and political influence -- 12.4. Who wins the influence game? -- 12.5. Political reform of regulation -- 12.6. Better information, more democracy -- 12.7. Summary -- 13. An overview of environmental legislation -- 13.0. Introduction -- 13.1. Cleaning the air -- 13.2. Fishable and swimmable waters -- 13.3. Hazardous waste disposal on land -- 13.4. Chemicals and pesticides -- 13.5. Endangered species protection -- 13.6. Summary -- 14. The regulatory record : achievements and obstacles -- 14.0. Introduction -- 14.1. Accomplishments of environmental regulation -- 14.2. Normative criticism of regulation -- 14.3. Cost-effectiveness criticisms of regulation -- 14.4. Beyond regulation? : promoting clean technology -- 14.5. Summary -- 15. Monitoring and enforcement -- 15.0. Introduction -- 15.1. The economics of crime -- 15.2. The economics of punishment -- 15.3. The compliance record -- 15.4. The political economy of enforcement -- 15.5. Citizen enforcement -- 15.6. Cost-effective enforcement -- 15.7. Summary --
  • pt. III.
  • How can we do better? -- 16. Incentive-based regulation : theory -- 16.0. Introduction -- 16.1. The cost-effectiveness rule -- 16.2. IB regulation and cost-effectiveness -- 16.3. IB regulation and technological progress -- 16.4. Potential problems with IB regulation -- 16.5. Summary -- Appendix 16A. Imperfect regulation in an uncertain world -- Appendix 16B. Incentive-compatible regulation -- 17. Incentive-based regulation : practice -- 17.0. Introduction -- 17.1. Lead and chlorofluorocarbons -- 17.2. Trading urban air pollutants -- 17.3. Marketable permits and acid rain -- 17.4. Recent US cap-and-trade moves : carbon dioxide and mercury? -- 17.5. Pollution taxes and their relatives in the United States -- 17.6. Carbon drolide trading and taxes in Europe -- 17.7. Summary -- 18. promoting clean technology : theory -- 18.0. Introduction -- 18.1. Path dependence and clean technology -- 18.2. Clean technology defined -- 18.3. If you're so smart, why aren't you rich? -- 18.4. Picking the winning path -- 18.5. Promoting small-scale CTs -- 18.6 Promoting large-scale CTs -- 18.7. Clean technology : two case studies -- 18.8. Summary -- 19. Energy policy and the environment -- 19.0. Introduction -- 19.1. Technology options : electricity and heat -- 19.2. Policy options : electricity and heat -- 19.3. Technology options : transport -- 19.4. Policy options : transport -- 19.5. Slowing global warming at a profit? -- 19.6. Summary --
  • pt. IV.
  • Can we resolve global issues? -- 20. Poverty, population, and the environment -- 20.0. Introduction -- 20.1. Poverty and the environment -- 20.2. The population picture in perspective -- 20.3. An economic approach to family size -- 20.4. Controlling population growth -- 20.5. Consumption and the global environment -- 20.6. Envisioning a sustainable future -- 20.7. Summary -- 21. Environmental policy in poor countries -- 21.0. Introduction -- 21.1. The political economy of sustainable development -- 21.2. Ending environmentally damaging subsidies -- 21.3. Establishing and enforcing property rights -- 21.4. Regulatory approaches -- 21.5. Sustainable technology : development and transfer -- 21.6. Resource conservation and debt relief -- 21.7. Trade and the environment -- 21.8. Summary -- 22. The economics of global agreements -- 22.0. Introduction -- 22.1. Agreements as public goods -- 22.2. Monitoring and enforcement -- 22.3. The ozone layer and biodiversity -- 22.4 Stopping global warning : theory -- 22.5. Stopping global warming : reality -- 22.6 Summary
Control code
FIEb13873155
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
Fifth edition.
Extent
xvi, 512 pages
Isbn
9780471763093
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)76940056

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