Coverart for item
The Resource Boundaries, extents and circulations : space and spatiality in early modern natural philosophy, Koen Vermeir, Jonathan Regier, editors, (electronic resource)

Boundaries, extents and circulations : space and spatiality in early modern natural philosophy, Koen Vermeir, Jonathan Regier, editors, (electronic resource)

Label
Boundaries, extents and circulations : space and spatiality in early modern natural philosophy
Title
Boundaries, extents and circulations
Title remainder
space and spatiality in early modern natural philosophy
Statement of responsibility
Koen Vermeir, Jonathan Regier, editors
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
NhCcYBP
Dewey number
223
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Vermeir, Koen
  • Regier, Jonathan
Series statement
  • Studies in history and philosophy of science
  • Springer eBooks.
Series volume
volume 41
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Space
Label
Boundaries, extents and circulations : space and spatiality in early modern natural philosophy, Koen Vermeir, Jonathan Regier, editors, (electronic resource)
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Introduction: Early Modern Ideas of Space and Spatiality; 1 Boundaries, Extents and Circulations: An Introduction to Spatiality and the Early Modern Concept of Space ; Abstract ; 1.1 The Concepts of Space and Place; 1.2 Mathematical Extents; 1.3 The Divine Void; 1.4 Earthly and Celestial Spaces; 1.5 Boundaries and Circulations; 1.6 Conclusion; References; 2 Leibniz and the Petrifying Virtue of the Place ; Abstract ; References; 3 Francesco Patrizi and the New Geometry of Space ; Abstract ; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 The Development of Patrizi's Philosophy of Space
  • 3.3 Sources and Innovations of Patrizi's Metaphysics of Space3.4 The Epistemology of Geometry; 3.5 The Geometry of Space; References; 4 The Inception of the Concept of Infinite Physical Space in the Time of Copernicus and Giordano Bruno ; Abstract ; 4.1 Copernican Heliocentrism Partakes in a Cosmic Space Which Is Both Immense and Immobile; 4.2 From "Place" to Space in the Natural Philosophy of the Renaissance; 4.3 Extensive Infinity and the Properties of Cosmic Space; References; 5 The Perception of Spatial Depth in Kepler's and Descartes' Optics: A Study of an Epistemological Reversal
  • Abstract 5.1 Perceiving Distance and Spatial Properties in Optics Before Kepler; 5.2 The Status of Reflected and Refracted Images in Optics Before Kepler; 5.3 The Perception of the Location and Distance of Reflected and Refracted Images in Kepler's Optics: An Approach Between Physics and Psychology; 5.4 The Perception of Distance Through a Natural Geometry in Descartes' Optics; 5.5 Conclusion; References; 6 Experimental Cartesianism and the Problem of Space ; Abstract ; 6.1 Descartes on Space and Void; 6.2 Pascal and Descartes; 6.3 Cartesian Experimentalism and the Problem of Vacuum
  • 6.4 ConclusionsReferences; 7 Putting the Devil on the Map: Demonology and Cosmography in the Renaissance ; Abstract ; 7.1 The Devil, Prince of This World; 7.2 New Horizons; 7.3 Analogies; 7.4 Demons on the Move; References; 8 All Space Will Pass Away: The Spiritual, Spaceless and Incorporeal Heaven of Valentin Weigel (1533-1588) ; Abstract ; 8.1 A Fundamental Dichotomy: Locative and Utopian, Bodily and Spiritual; 8.2 On the Place of the World: A Locative Start for a Utopian Argument; 8.3 From a Space Hovering in no Place to a Utopian Heaven: Nothing to Nobody; 8.4 Conclusion; Bibliography
  • 9 'Borders,' 'Leaps' and 'Orbs of Virtue:' A Contextual Reconstruction of Francis Bacon's Extension-Related Concepts Abstract ; 9.1 Introduction; 9.2 The "Orbs of Virtue" in Magnetic Philosophy: Natural Philosophical and Operational Aspects; 9.3 Spatial Organization: Limits, Orientation and Symmetries; 9.4 Operational Drive and Natural Philosophical Difficulties: Perception, Collaboration and the Common Good in Gilbert' and Kepler's Magnetic Philosophy; 9.5 Francis Bacon's Operational Treatment of the Orbs of Virtue and the "Measures of Space"
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Use of this electronic resource may be governed by a license agreement which restricts use to the European University Institute community. Each user is responsible for limiting use to individual, non-commercial purposes, without systematically downloading, distributing, or retaining substantial portions of information, provided that all copyright and other proprietary notices contained on the materials are retained. The use of software, including scripts, agents, or robots, is generally prohibited and may result in the loss of access to these resources for the entire European University Institute community
Isbn
9783319410753
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)958650941
Label
Boundaries, extents and circulations : space and spatiality in early modern natural philosophy, Koen Vermeir, Jonathan Regier, editors, (electronic resource)
Link
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Introduction: Early Modern Ideas of Space and Spatiality; 1 Boundaries, Extents and Circulations: An Introduction to Spatiality and the Early Modern Concept of Space ; Abstract ; 1.1 The Concepts of Space and Place; 1.2 Mathematical Extents; 1.3 The Divine Void; 1.4 Earthly and Celestial Spaces; 1.5 Boundaries and Circulations; 1.6 Conclusion; References; 2 Leibniz and the Petrifying Virtue of the Place ; Abstract ; References; 3 Francesco Patrizi and the New Geometry of Space ; Abstract ; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 The Development of Patrizi's Philosophy of Space
  • 3.3 Sources and Innovations of Patrizi's Metaphysics of Space3.4 The Epistemology of Geometry; 3.5 The Geometry of Space; References; 4 The Inception of the Concept of Infinite Physical Space in the Time of Copernicus and Giordano Bruno ; Abstract ; 4.1 Copernican Heliocentrism Partakes in a Cosmic Space Which Is Both Immense and Immobile; 4.2 From "Place" to Space in the Natural Philosophy of the Renaissance; 4.3 Extensive Infinity and the Properties of Cosmic Space; References; 5 The Perception of Spatial Depth in Kepler's and Descartes' Optics: A Study of an Epistemological Reversal
  • Abstract 5.1 Perceiving Distance and Spatial Properties in Optics Before Kepler; 5.2 The Status of Reflected and Refracted Images in Optics Before Kepler; 5.3 The Perception of the Location and Distance of Reflected and Refracted Images in Kepler's Optics: An Approach Between Physics and Psychology; 5.4 The Perception of Distance Through a Natural Geometry in Descartes' Optics; 5.5 Conclusion; References; 6 Experimental Cartesianism and the Problem of Space ; Abstract ; 6.1 Descartes on Space and Void; 6.2 Pascal and Descartes; 6.3 Cartesian Experimentalism and the Problem of Vacuum
  • 6.4 ConclusionsReferences; 7 Putting the Devil on the Map: Demonology and Cosmography in the Renaissance ; Abstract ; 7.1 The Devil, Prince of This World; 7.2 New Horizons; 7.3 Analogies; 7.4 Demons on the Move; References; 8 All Space Will Pass Away: The Spiritual, Spaceless and Incorporeal Heaven of Valentin Weigel (1533-1588) ; Abstract ; 8.1 A Fundamental Dichotomy: Locative and Utopian, Bodily and Spiritual; 8.2 On the Place of the World: A Locative Start for a Utopian Argument; 8.3 From a Space Hovering in no Place to a Utopian Heaven: Nothing to Nobody; 8.4 Conclusion; Bibliography
  • 9 'Borders,' 'Leaps' and 'Orbs of Virtue:' A Contextual Reconstruction of Francis Bacon's Extension-Related Concepts Abstract ; 9.1 Introduction; 9.2 The "Orbs of Virtue" in Magnetic Philosophy: Natural Philosophical and Operational Aspects; 9.3 Spatial Organization: Limits, Orientation and Symmetries; 9.4 Operational Drive and Natural Philosophical Difficulties: Perception, Collaboration and the Common Good in Gilbert' and Kepler's Magnetic Philosophy; 9.5 Francis Bacon's Operational Treatment of the Orbs of Virtue and the "Measures of Space"
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Use of this electronic resource may be governed by a license agreement which restricts use to the European University Institute community. Each user is responsible for limiting use to individual, non-commercial purposes, without systematically downloading, distributing, or retaining substantial portions of information, provided that all copyright and other proprietary notices contained on the materials are retained. The use of software, including scripts, agents, or robots, is generally prohibited and may result in the loss of access to these resources for the entire European University Institute community
Isbn
9783319410753
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)958650941

Library Locations

    • Badia FiesolanaBorrow it
      Via dei Roccettini 9, San Domenico di Fiesole, 50014, IT
      43.803074 11.283055
Processing Feedback ...