Coverart for item
The Resource Barlaam and Ioasaph, John Damascene ; with an English translation by G.R. Woodward and Harold Mattingly, (electronic resource)

Barlaam and Ioasaph, John Damascene ; with an English translation by G.R. Woodward and Harold Mattingly, (electronic resource)

Label
Barlaam and Ioasaph
Title
Barlaam and Ioasaph
Statement of responsibility
John Damascene ; with an English translation by G.R. Woodward and Harold Mattingly
Creator
Contributor
Author
Translator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • grc
  • grc
  • eng
Summary
Barlaam and Ioasaph, a hagiographic novel in which an Indian prince becomes aware of the world's miseries and is converted to Christianity by a monk, is a Christianized version of the legend of the Buddha. Though often attributed to John Damascene (c. 676-749 CE), it was probably translated from Georgian into Greek in the eleventh century CE.
Member of
Assigning source
Provided by Publisher
Cataloging source
MaCbHUP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
John
Language note
Text in Greek with English translation on facing pages
Literary form
novels
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1884-1964
  • 1848-1934
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Mattingly, Harold
  • Woodward, George Ratcliffe
Series statement
Loeb classical library online
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Gautama Buddha
  • John
  • Christian legends
Summary expansion
One of the best known examples of the hagiographic novel, this is the tale of an Indian prince who becomes aware of the world's miseries and is converted to Christianity by the monk Barlaam. Barlaam and Josaphat (Ioasaph) were believed to have re-converted India after her lapse from conversion to Christianity, and they were numbered among the Christian saints. Centuries ago likenesses were noticed between the life of Josaphat and the life of the Buddha; the resemblances are in incidents, doctrine, and philosophy, and Barlaam's rules of abstinence resemble the Buddhist monk's. But not till the mid-nineteenth century was it recognised that, in Josaphat, the Buddha had been venerated as a Christian saint for about a thousand years. The origin of the story of Barlaam and Ioasaph--which in itself has little peculiar to Buddhism--appears to be a Manichaean tract produced in Central Asia. It was welcomed by the Arabs and by the Georgians. The Greek romance of Barlaam appears separately first in the 11th century. Most of the Greek manuscripts attribute the story to John the Monk, and it is only some later scribes who identify this John with John Damascene (ca. 676-749). There is strong evidence in Latin and Georgian as well as Greek that it was the Georgian Euthymius (who died in 1028) who caused the story to be translated from Georgian into Greek, the whole being reshaped and supplemented. The Greek romance soon spread throughout Christendom, and was translated into Latin, Old Slavonic, Armenian, and Arabic. An English version (from Latin) was used by Shakespeare in his caskets scene in The Merchant of Venice. David M. Lang's Introduction traces parallels between the Buddhist and Christian legends, discusses the importance of Arabic versions, and notes influences of the Manichaean creed--
Target audience
general
Label
Barlaam and Ioasaph, John Damascene ; with an English translation by G.R. Woodward and Harold Mattingly, (electronic resource)
Link
https://eui.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://www.loebclassics.com/view/LCL034/1914/volume.xml
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Control code
hup0000134
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Use of this electronic resource may be governed by a license agreement which restricts use to the European University Institute community. Each user is responsible for limiting use to individual, non-commercial purposes, without systematically downloading, distributing, or retaining substantial portions of information, provided that all copyright and other proprietary notices contained on the materials are retained. The use of software, including scripts, agents, or robots, is generally prohibited and may result in the loss of access to these resources for the entire European University Institute community
Isbn
9780674990388
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)910938485
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web
Label
Barlaam and Ioasaph, John Damascene ; with an English translation by G.R. Woodward and Harold Mattingly, (electronic resource)
Link
https://eui.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://www.loebclassics.com/view/LCL034/1914/volume.xml
Publication
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Control code
hup0000134
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Use of this electronic resource may be governed by a license agreement which restricts use to the European University Institute community. Each user is responsible for limiting use to individual, non-commercial purposes, without systematically downloading, distributing, or retaining substantial portions of information, provided that all copyright and other proprietary notices contained on the materials are retained. The use of software, including scripts, agents, or robots, is generally prohibited and may result in the loss of access to these resources for the entire European University Institute community
Isbn
9780674990388
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)910938485
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web

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